SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION

Guest Artist Series—Guest Artist Series subscribers save 15%! Save 10% with the Guest Artist Mini-Series! Just purchase tickets to two or more separate events.

College Performing Arts Series—Patrons can save 25% with two easy ways to subscribe: Subscriptions and Passbooks. Season subscriptions offer same-night, same-seat tickets to every performance in the series. The Passbook is a coupon redeemable for five tickets that can be used in any combination to one or more of the College Performing Arts Series shows. Advance reservations are required. Passbook coupons are only redeemable for performances scheduled Thursday through Sunday. All performances are reserved seating.

Saturday Morning Children’s Series—Designed for short attention spans, these performances are 50 to 60 minutes in length and are general admission seating. Saturday Morning Children’s Series subscribers save 10% and are assured lost ticket protection.

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TESS

Roman Polanski, United Kingdom, 1979, 171 minutes, Color, English

June 6, 2016 at 7 p.m.

This multiple-Oscar-winning film by Roman Polanski is an exquisite, richly layered adaptation of Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles. A strong-willed peasant girl (Nastassja Kinski, in a gorgeous breakthrough) is sent by her father to the estate of some local aristocrats to capitalize on a rumor that their families are from the same line. This fateful visit commences an epic narrative of sex, class, betrayal, and revenge, which Polanski unfolds with deliberation and finesse. With its earthy visual textures, achieved by two world-class cinematographers-Geoffrey Unsworth (Cabaret and Ghislain Cloquet (Au hasard Balthazar)-Tess is a work of great pastoral beauty as well as vivid storytelling.






SAMURAI II: DUEL AT ICHIJOJI TEMPLE

Hiroshi Inagaki, Japan, 1955, 103 minutes, Color, Japanese (English subtitles)

June 13, 2016 at 7 p.m.

Toshiro Mifune furiously embodies swordsman Musashi Miyamoto as he comes into his own in the action-packed middle section of the Samurai Trilogy. Duel at Ichijoji Temple furthers Miyamoto along his path to spiritual enlightenment, as well as further from the arms of the two women who love him: loyal Otsu (Kaoru Yachigusa) and conniving yet tragic Akemi (Mariko Okada). The film also brings him face to face with hordes of rivals intent on cutting him down, especially his legendary rival Kojiro (Koji Tsuruta). The titular climax is one of Japanese cinema's most rousingly choreographed conflicts, intensified by Jun Yasumoto's color cinematography and Ikuma Dan's triumphant score.



PERSONA

Ingmar Bergman, Sweden, 1966, 83 minutes, B&W, Swedish (English subtitles)

June 20, 2016 at 7 p.m.

By the midsixties, Ingmar Bergman had already conjured many of the cinema's most unforgettable images. But with the radical Persona, this supreme artist attained new levels of visual poetry. In the first of a series of legendary performances for Bergman, Liv Ullmann plays a stage actor who has inexplicably gone mute; an equally mesmerizing Bibi Andersson is the garrulous young nurse caring for her in a remote island cottage. While isolated together there, the women perform a mysterious spiritual and emotional transference that would prove to be one of cinema's most influential creations. Acted with astonishing nuance and shot in stark contrast and soft light by the great Sven Nykvist, Persona is a penetrating, dreamlike work of profound psychological depth.



BABETTE'S FEAST

Gabriel Axel, Denmark, 1987, 104 minutes, Color, Danish (English subtitles)

June 27, 2016 at 7 p.m.

At once a rousing paean to artistic creation, a delicate evocation of divine grace, and the ultimate film about food, the Oscar-winning Babette's Feast is a deeply beloved treasure of cinema. Directed by Gabriel Axel and adapted from a story by Isak Dinesen, it is the lovingly layered tale of a French housekeeper with a mysterious past who brings quiet revolution in the form of one exquisite meal to a circle of starkly pious villagers in late nineteenth-century Denmark. Babette's Feast combines earthiness and reverence in an indescribably moving depiction of sensual pleasure that goes to your head like fine champagne.






VALERIE AND HER WEEK OF WONDERS

Jaromil Jireš, Czechoslovakia, 1970, 76 minutes, Color, Czech (English subtitles)

July 11, 2016, at 7 p.m.

A girl on the verge of womanhood finds herself in a sensual fantasyland of vampires, witchcraft, and other threats in this eerie and mystical movie daydream. Valerie and Her Week of Wonders serves up an endlessly looping, nonlinear fairy tale, set in a quasi-medieval landscape. Ravishingly shot, enchantingly scored, and spilling over with surreal fancies, this enticing phantasmagoria from director Jaromil Jireš is among the most beautiful oddities of the Czechoslovak New Wave.






THE LONELINESS OF THE LONG DISTANCE RUNNER

Tony Richardson, United Kingdom, 1962, 73 minutes, English

July 18, 2016 at 7 p.m.

Dry and full of angst, this British New Wave classic features potent social commentary and a star making performance by Tom Courtenay as a textbook example of the "angry young man." Fleet-footed Colin Smith (Tom Courtenay) is a rebellious teenager in the poverty-stricken town of Nottingham, in northern England, who enjoys running as an escape from his harsh reality. Caught stealing cash from a bakery, Colin is sent to a reform school where the manipulative governor (Michael Redgrave) promotes sports as rehabilitation by enlisting Colin in a foot race against a prestigious rival school. What the governor doesn't realize is that Colin is not so easily disciplined.






SAMURAI III: DUEL AT GANRYU ISLAND

Hiroshi Inagaki, Japan, 1956, 104 minutes, Color Japanese (English subtitles)

July 25, 2016 at 7 p.m.

A disillusioned Musashi Miyamoto (Toshiro Mifune) has turned his back on the samurai life, becoming a farmer in a remote village, while his nemesis Kojiro (Koji Tsuruta) now works for the shogun. Circumstances bring them back together for one final face-off. Though it's marked by a memorably intense final battle sequence, the rousing conclusion to the Samurai Trilogy is engaged with matters of the heart as well, as Miyamoto must ask himself what it is that makes a warrior and a man.




Please continue to check our website for August screenings!